April 27, 2014

How to Make a DIY Silicone Mould

DIY Silicone Mold | @fallfordiy

This is a really easy and fast way of making a silicone mold. You can quickly take casts of anything hard and durable and remove it when the silicone is set after about 20 minutes! Then your mold is ready to go!

NOTE: I’m working on a variation of this How to make a DIY silicone mould tutorial that is food safe and you can use for chocolates and cakes etc. If you’re interested in being the first to find out about that then sign up to our mailing list or follow us on social.  The links are all on the left here <

Working on getting the new site up and running has meant I have neglected my ‘How to’ series. But we’re back with probably one of my favourite tutorials that has so much potential. This DIY is something I’ve been working on for ages! Being able to quickly and easily make a mould means I can make clay, resin and concrete (to name a few) versions of pretty much anything I like… Think of the possibilities!

So, like I say I have been working on this for a long time. The idea originally came from this post, which was awesome but I found it a was lacking a few key details so I recreated it here. I tried several different materials, techniques and combinations so some of the details in the pictures may change – so read through carefully!

Materials:

– Silicone Sealant – So this is important. It has to say silicone on it! I tried with different sealants and some worked… some really did not. The one in the picture below worked ok, but the best I tried was a “bathroom silicone sealant” which produced the final mould.

– Caulking gun – to get the silicone out.

– Hand soap

– A positive to make the mould out of

– Bowl or bucket that isn’t used for food (because you’re not going to want to eat of of it again!)

DIY Silicone Mould | @fallfordiy

Instructions:

1. Mix your soap and water together. I’ve done it roughly about 1 part soap to 10 parts water.

Whoa! We’ve changed soap colour here. This tutorial took a few times to get right, so we now have purple soap for the rest of the DIY. Like magic!

DIY Silicone Mould | @fallfordiy

2. Cut the end off the silicone and without using the nozzle squeeze it all out using the calking gun. If you’re making a small mould you can just use a little and save the rest for another time.

3. Work the silicone until it is not sticky. I used both my hands to pull and squeeze the silicone whilst it was submerged in the water for about 5 minutes.

4. Keeping it wet transfer into a container. This step was not in the original tutorial but as the silicone drys it gets very sticky so you want it somewhere it won’t make a huge mess! The soapy water keeps stops it from sticking to your hands so don’t dry them yet either.

DIY Silicone Mould | @fallfordiy

5. Press your object into the silicone to create the mould. You’ll want something with smooth edges that the silicone will peal off easily. This resin bracelet was perfect.

6. Leave the object in your resin until the mould is firm. This doesn’t take very long. Mine was set in just a couple of hours! Carefully peel the object out of the mould and the mould out of the container (so you can use it again!)

You might be wondering why I needed to make a silicone mould of a bracelet that I just made from a mould I already have…. right? Silicone moulds are ace for different materials and I needed something more flexible for a very special tutorial I’ll be able to share really soon with you! In the mean time I’ll probably be making moulds of everything I can think of, so expect to see more of this!

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195 thoughts on “How to Make a DIY Silicone Mould

  1. Sandra

    Hey, do you think this will work for candle molds? I’d really appreciate your response, thanks for a great tutorial!

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      I don’t see why not, but I haven’t tested the silicone with heat myself yet. I might do a few experiments and come back to you to make sure.

      Reply
      1. Kevin

        Most silicone handles up to 400 degrees quite easily. It should be fine. You just want to make sure you don’t have air pockets in the mold that may expand at a different ratio.

        Reply
      2. Harriet batchelor

        Hi I am from England, UK and am having trouble finding a silicone that will work…. I have tried all purpose silicone translucent but it hasn’t worked. Could you please offer me some advise on which brand works the best? Thank you

        Reply
        1. fran Post author

          Hey Harriet!

          I’ve used a few different brands but I normally go to Wilkinsons because their silicone is really cheap and it works well. Try the silisone with the sea lion on the tube ;)

          Hope that helps! xx

          Reply
        2. James segar

          Hi Hrriet i work in trade my self and most translucents are that good ive tried most and i recommend using decorators caulk fat hog it comes in white brown or magnolia sadly not tanslicent but id say its best bet its flexably so its perfect for molding

          Reply
      3. phueng

        Wow i very love it . But I’ve seen some website mix silicone with power. What the best way? plsssssss.

        Reply
      4. Sally M. Lange

        My brother made beautiful candles using his own hand made silicone molds. He replicated textured glassware by making a silicone mold of it. The wired wick was inserted later through a hole that he drilled with a very small heated drill bit in the candle’s center. I have a white round bowl-shaped candle that looks like milk glass. It is stunning. I never could bear to burn it, and it looks as nice today as it did 15 years ago when he gave it to me.

        Reply
      1. fran Post author

        Amazing, thanks for getting in touch and letting us know. You’re making me want to make candles now. Oh the possibilities!

        Reply
  2. Alicia

    This looks awesome, but I’ve got a couple of questions: Do you leave the object in the silicone until it dries, or take it out immediately? Also, how long does the silicone take to set up?

    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hi Alicia! I completely forgot to put these details in the post. Thanks for reminding me! Leave the object in the silicone. It’s easy to remove once the silicone is set, which only takes about 1-2 hours. Really quick!

      Reply
      1. Maddie

        Hi,
        Can you use anything you want to make a mould?
        Like a polymer clay object or oreo cookie or something.
        Or will that permanently stick to the silicone?
        Maybe put oil on the object?
        Thanks for reading :-)
        Hope you can help.

        Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hi Helen,

      I didn’t coat the bracelet, but as it was resin it has a nice shiny outer layer anyway. Plastics and other hard shiny surfaces should be ok as well. I imagine any surfaces that might be porous like fabric or wood might need a layer of glue or vaseline over the top. I’ll be experimenting loads with this technique so I’ll see what I can find out!

      Thanks for your question!

      Reply
      1. Patrick R

        Just don’t try to make a mould of a silicone object. Silicone doesn’t play well with silicone!

        Reply
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  5. Catollie

    just wondering what materials could be used as a food grade source.
    buying molding kits for fondant etc. are expensive. but some of those molds are also silicone. or even using the rubber dip that you can find have you tried that as a molding source? TIA

    Reply
    1. Eve

      Hi Catolie,

      For food grade silicon, I am using Amazing mold putty. You can buy it easily online. It is working well with fondant, resin, clay and you can bake it.

      Have fun :-)

      Reply
    2. fran Post author

      Hey,

      I’m pretty sure you can’t use this silicone with food items. The smell alone is a bit chemically. I have also bought silicone molds for fondant, but I’m afraid I don’t know how you can make a safe mold for food. Have you tried pressing shapes into compact brown sugar and using this as a mold?

      Reply
      1. Maxim

        Please do not advice something you do not have any knowledge of it.

        Silicon for food uses and the Silicon for windows as a very different chemical with in.

        Silicon for windows will keep bacteria on the surface… When a Silicon for food use will not.

        If people get food poisoning after your advice you will be Unfortunately directly responsible.

        Please don’t be lazy and do the minimum research and don’t advice on a hunch.

        Reply
        1. fran Post author

          Hello Maxim!

          If you read through the comments you’ll see I have advised very strongly against using this with food. I have used it only for clay or concrete to create jewellery or other small trinkets.

          Reply
        2. Amanda

          Maxim perhaps you should fully read comments before responding. She wasn’t remotely telling anyone to use this on food safe items.

          Reply
        3. Tracie

          How dare you call her lazy LMFAOOOO when you were the lazy one not reading her comments to see she did NOT advise using for food. Cheesh.

          Reply
    3. Andrea

      You can make a mold for fondant from fondant. Use some of your old fondant (use your older stuff for this) and dust with cornstartch. Stick what you want to mold and take out and let dry. I saw a video on youtube. The lady use practically anything–mcdonald toys, toy cars–whatever you want. Paint and you have a great fondant decoration for your cake.

      Reply
  6. Jessica

    you can also use silicone sealant and cornstarch.. dump cornstarch on a smooth surface.. the pump out the silicone sealant, enough for what ever you need to mold. knead the cornstarch into the silicone adding cornstarch as needed and work it until it isn’t sticky. lightly coat whatever your going to mold with petroleum jelly or spray lightly with cooking spray and press into the silicon and leave to dry/cure. it works for lots of small things such as pendents for jewelry etc.

    Reply
      1. fran Post author

        Hey Cherie,

        Thanks! Just make sure you get one that has the word “silicone” on the tube, but I think that any brand is fine. I usually use the cheapest ;)

        Reply
    1. Puzzlme

      I did an ornate oval frame with both recipes. Due to the size of my project I used an overlay rather than a press method. I found the soapy water was not as messy to prepare, it was quicker and much easier on the hands.. With the soapy water method you can pinch off pieces and add them to the mold without causing lines. The cornstarch recipe worked very well but it had to be done in one large application or it formed lines in the mold.

      Reply
    1. Annette

      The silicone needs to state on the packaging that it is paintable otherwise the paint won’t stick.

      Reply
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  8. Tony

    One quick comment to piggy-back on something that was already said. Do NOT use kitchen or bathroom silicon sealant for anything that will touch food related items. These sealants have chemicals to prevent the growth of mold (like cyanide!! YIKES!) mixed into them.

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Thanks for clearing that up Tony. Definitely don’t want those things to be touching food! Also probably wise to wash your hands well after you’ve been making/using the mold as well.

      Reply
      1. Lucinda Price

        If you use nitrile exam gloves (like the kind that are used in medical clinics now in place of latex), that will protect you from the chemicals you might be exposed to if you handle the sealant for extended periods of time. :-)

        Reply
    2. sandy

      I am making candy bars and other types of chocolate candies. The molds in the store dont have the shapes i need so when i saw this i was excited until i saw a post about not for food. So what kind do i use for food again. I think i saw it in a post but could you elaborate on it this please. Thanks

      Reply
  9. Florence

    Thanks for this. I have been looking for something to use to make a dolls head mold. I live on a mountain miles from anywhere and find it hard to get supplies but I can buy silicon from the local butchers!!
    Will give it a go :)

    Reply
  10. Kelly

    There is a silicone that is heat resistant, we had to use it when we installed our pellet stove. This is such a great idea. Thanks for sharing!!!

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Kelly! Thanks for that pearl of wisdom. Heat resistant silicone would be perfect for candle making… the options are endless! :)

      Reply
  11. Pat Simcox

    Hi, this sounds fabulous !! Would the moulds work with polymer clay do you think ?? Also are they flexible when they set so you can get the object out easily ?? Thank you.

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Pat,
      Yes! I’ve used them myself with polymer clay. They work brilliantly. The reason I wanted to make silicone moulds is for making objects out of concrete. I needed something flexible to keep the concrete intact when I was releasing it. These moulds are perfect for that requirement. I have also popped the mould, with clay set inside, in the freezer for half an hour to make it even easier to get the clay out before heating. Works a treat. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  12. Silver Otter

    I have been wanting to restore an old mirror with plaster framing there are several places where the plaster has been broken off it was always one of those how can i do it projects. now i know i’ll make a mold of a good section . then pour plaster into that and glue the dried product to the mirror then paint and gild it. Won’t my friend mate be surprised when i restore her special floor length oval mirror. She asked me years old to fix it now i can. thanks

    Reply
    1. pat hook

      I have repaired several old frames and mirrors. I use a rubbery mold marterial I buy at a craft store. But instead of using plaster to make the repo. parts I use Creative Paper Clay. It’s strong and carves and fills in bad spots with a little water.
      You need to use cornstarch or talc as a mold release. pat

      Reply
    1. fran Post author

      I have never made soaps, but I think it would. That’s something I’d really love to do… I’m going to do some research!

      Reply
      1. Amanda

        I do wonder about the chemicals causing skin reactions if you are making soap. Some purple have sensitive skin. I did see something above about aquarium sealant possibly being safer. I would defiantly read the warning lables and take those in to consideration when making food or bath and body products.

        Reply
  13. Marge

    Jaclyn – Pewter melts at 340-450 degrees. If your silicone is good to only 400 you might have a problem, but if you find some that is for heat resistant , like Kelly mentioned.

    Reply
    1. Diana

      Well, from everything I have read, why not use a silicone mold to make a cement mold, then use the new cement mold for the pewter casting …. just a thought

      Reply
      1. fran Post author

        Thanks Diana! These are all processes you can do easily at home. If anyone tries this out I’d love to see the results!

        Reply
        1. Kzoo Kid

          Diana, the double-mold process works great. I’ve used it many times to make plaster molds for glass casting. The plaster molds are destroyed by heat needed to melt the glass, but the silicone mold they’re made from is good for many, many reuses.

          Fran, good tutorial, thanks. Gonna have to check out the rest of the site.

          Reply
  14. karrie

    ive gotten all the stuff to try to make a couple molds for some buttons and maybe some pendants. how do you store your molds after youve made them?

    Reply
    1. Kzoo Kid

      karrie, anywhere cool & dry will be fine. As long as the mold is completely cured, it won’t stick to a shelf or whatever you set it on. Any dusty bits that settle on it after a while can be rinsed off with plain water before using.

      Reply
    1. papasansgirl

      I made a soap hand using a disposable kitchen glove. I poured the soap in a bit at a time, waited for each layer to cool & set only enough so I could adjust the pose of the fingers & the hand. Then the next layer, etc. Temperature of the soap had to be warm enough to pour but not hot enough to melt the previous layer’s shaping on contact. A slow process, but I was also able to press in features like nail edges & crease lines at the knuckles, before the soap completely set. It took a few days.
      I’d tried to make a mould out of dental mould mix as the amount of latex required would have cost too much. It would have been great to have known about this silicon method… except that keeping a hand in the setting silicon for 2 hours is a big ask. And would the mould have to be cut in 2 pieces to get the living hand out? (& the soap hand too)

      Reply
  15. farrah

    cest beau ce que vous faite etr je sai je suis tres interer de faire et de creer des modeles car je sui sure de faire mieu et meme plus mai jai pas les moyen de materiel sasserais tres reconnaissante pour la puit que vous me raporterais, mercie manque ces creation et ideé et model et nous avons bon acheteur,

    mon portable :00213698586348
    facebook;farrahfati

    mercie

    Reply
  16. Emily S

    Heya,
    Just wondering whether anyone has attempted this tutorial for a two part mould and used anything like porcelain slip? I would really love to make ball jointed dolls, which means making two part slip moulds to achieve hollow body parts, but I can not bare the concept of the expense for a liquid silicon mould kit!

    The tutorial is fab by the way- I will find some use for it whether it is the above described or not, I have no doubt xD

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Emily,

      I have not tried anything like that. Hopefully someone might comment who can help maybe?
      Thanks for your lovely compliments about the tutorial though. I hope you fins it useful!

      x

      Reply
    2. marcella

      Hi Emily, and excuse me Fran if I step right in with an answer. I am not sure silicone moulds would work with porcelain slip, as the point in getting hollow parts is making the porcelain powder in the slip adhere to the mould walls while the liquid part of the slip gets soaked up by the mould itself, which therefore should be quite porous to do this. I used to cast tiny miniature cups using gesso moulds and don’t know of any alternatives that work as well.

      Fran, great tutorial indeed! I am quite a heavy silicone mould user and will surely give this a try! Just a question: does the silicone dry up even while in the soapy water or does the water keep the silicone workable a bit longer?
      Thanks again!

      Reply
    3. Vanessa Emmons

      I don’t think this would be good for clay as the plaster molds used for ceramics absorbs the liquid allowing the clay to set. silicone would not allow for that and it would take a day (or more) to get enough thickness to pour out the excess. Would be great if it would work huh?

      Reply
  17. Mary

    I wonder if this would work to make mold’s of leaves for doing concrete,etc. In the winter I have no leaves to work with,this would be great if it would work. What do you think?

    Reply
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  20. karrie loughridge

    I am going to try this for making some molds outta of some buttons and maybe some pendants. what do you store your molds in after your done using them?

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Karrie,

      I love that idea of using buttons to make moulds. You could make some really interesting things out of those! I just throw my molds into a big box. As long as they don’t come into contact with any sharp objects they should be fine.

      Reply
  21. Catalina

    Really nice tutorial! I have been trying to make molds for a while now and I bought some liquid silicone but it turned out to be to expensive and tedious. Do you think I could make a two faced mold for plaster with the example you just did? Im thinking of just covering my whole object and then just cutting out the silicone in half when is done. Or is the silicone to hard? thank you!

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Catalina,

      This silicone mold is perfect for this use. The silicone is soft and easily sliced with a craft knife. I have not tried it myself but I think you can definitely use this technique to make a two faced mold xx

      Reply
  22. kristie

    Does this mold stay flexible so you can make a mold of a solid object can be fully incased with the silicone mold material can be crafter the material sets, with a razor blade directly down middle starting from one side and around to other side leaving bottom of mold untouched.

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Yeah, it’s really flexible. If you check the comments I wrote a little bit about this somewhere. But basically it’s perfect for that sort of use :)

      Reply
  23. Lajuana

    I just this moment just made a mold using this method. mine set up in less than 30 minutes. I ended up using the whole caulking silicone and it was not enough for a large bangle. I have been searching for a way to make bangle bracelets and I like this tutorial. Before I seen you site and example I had an idea of doing just this method. I just did not think it would work. I used a very cheap dish liquid from the .99 cents store and in my opinion all dish liquid will work . Mine had a chlorine alternative. I do not know if that had to do anything with the quick curing silicone. Any way that this is great I will me making me another bangle mold this afternoon. i use thick and thin masking tape as my bangle object. Masking tape is great for a medium to large adult size hand.

    Reply
    1. Marcia

      Good to know the cheap dish soap works. I’ve seen more than one article stating must use Dawn Original which I bought for mine, in the future will try the cheap kind. Why pay more than you need to, right? Thanks!

      Reply
  24. Karenthor

    I have a cascading fountain made of very large concrete elephant ears. Over the years they have begun to crack and I’ve patched them many times. It’s getting to the point that I think I should just make new ones. The existing ones could be used to make the molds. How can I make molds of something large like this? Probably 2 ft wide by 3 ft long. About 1″ thick. Thanks!

    Reply
  25. Jen Hacker

    Hello,

    I have a human skull that I would love to make a mold of. Do you think this would work on a larger object like this? I thinking making two and piecing them together, would I need two tubes of sealant? I do not mind covering the skull in Vaseline for the process if I get a good result, the bone is ancient so it would probably do it some good!

    Any advice before proceeding would be fantastic.

    Jen

    Reply
    1. Jen Hacker

      I have just seen a previous comment from Kristie, I will try covering the whole skull and then cutting in half to remove. Any suggestions on how to attach both parts together? I have read may options like wet plaster and PVA, any suggestions?

      Reply
      1. marcella

        Hi Jen, I use modeler’s grade two-part silicone for my moulds: I can cut them up and the two parts stick together again with no problem at all, I only need a rubberband to keep them aligned while pouring the casting material in. It’s true I work in miniature and my moulds are quite small, but the properties of silcone should stay the same in any scale. Don’t know if this is true with the sealant kind as well, but it could be worth a try anyway.
        Hope this helps!

        Reply
  26. Joel Haas

    I have worked with a variety of silicones for moulds. For casting pewter, I suggest you find a company like Silicones, Inc in High Point, NC. They make a silicone for pewter casting that works much better than an ad hoc mold, particularly if you want to make a two or three piece mold. Always, be careful there is no water anywhere in your mold if you cast pewter! Water instantly turns into steam and explodes then metal outwards. In bronze casting, aluminum cast, etc, it is always common practice to preheat any metal or tools that will go into molten metal or heat shock will make the molten metal explode upwards. It is one of the most common ways people are badly injured in foundries. It is not so bad with pewter, but much depends on how much and how hot your pewter is.

    Food grade silicone rubber is very expensive because it has to be made in an all stainless steel environment subject to surprise inspections by the FDA (the same is true for companies making restaurant equipment) Making an entire manufacturing line over again in all stainless steel is very expensive.

    Silicone calk is a two part catalyst material. Acidic acid (know as vinegar) keeps the hardening agent from interacting with the silicone material. If you apply a thin layer repeatedly to an object it may go faster, or at least with fewer air bubbles. Too much caulk flopped together means the vinegar drys on the outside, allowing the outside to harden but keeping the inside squishy. Thin layers avoid that problem. Afterwards, make a back up mother mould to keep it from flopping around. I use plaster.

    Your caulk will go further with this method if you’re trying to stretch your material (pun intended.)
    Joel Haas, sculptor
    Raleigh, NC

    Reply
  27. Joel Haas

    I forgot to add in my info about pewter casting—make sure there are “vents” or “risers” cut into the mold. In other words, as metal goes into a mold the air has to leave the mold. If air is trapped or compressed in a part of the mold from which it cannot escape, the casting will have what’s called a “cold shut.” That is, the casting will be incomplete because the trapped air’s pressure was strong enough to hold the molten metal back. A vent should be cut into one side of the mold (I generally make two or three piece molds) with about a 1 mm groove coming off the edge of some part of the casting. The groove widens just a little bit before opening at the top of the mould.

    http://www.silicones-inc.com/
    http://www.polytek.com/

    As for mould making and making some larger items, I recommend casting aluminum in green sand. (No, green sand is no more green than green cheese–green simply means not aged or uncured). If you have a friend or spouse with some basic woodworking equipment, you’ll be surprised what you can make. I prefer to use aluminum from lawn chairs or awnings–it has up to 7% copper in it, making it much stronger. Drink cans are made of pure aluminum because it is so soft it can be punched into super thin sheets. They’re often full of residual liquid, so dry them out first.

    I suggest checking out some amateur sand casting web sites.

    Don’t dismiss the idea out of hand, women especially. When I was in welding school right after the last dinosaur died, a third of the class were women. The same was true a few years later in the blacksmithing classes. In fact, several presidents of ABANA (Artist Blacksmith Society of North America) have been women. Almost all metal working is about how smart you are, not how strong you are.

    http://www.myfoundrycoach.com/(Australian site, but still excellent for the States)
    http://www.myhomefoundry.com/ (Australian site, but still excellent for the States)
    http://www.abymc.com/
    http://www.castcraft.com/index.htm
    http://foundry101.com/
    http://incolor.inetnebr.com/bill_r/fun_with_molten_metal.htm
    http://www.backyardmetalcasting.com/index.html
    http://www.foundry-supplies.com/
    http://www.onlinemetals.com/index.cfm?affiliate_id=1014 (small orders)
    http://www.freemansupply.com/

    An excellent newsletter and series of books on sand casting with aluminum is sent out be the Australian foundry man Collen Croucher.

    Well, that’s too much for today!

    Joel Haas, sculptor
    Raleigh, NC

    Reply
  28. barry

    Use aquarium grade. Its considered safe for food contact when cured, unlike the construction grade that contains chemicals to kill mould and fungus growth. The kitchen and bathroom grade is the most toxic!! to prevent mould growth in the wet conditions of those places.

    Reply
    1. Jacqui Cherry

      Thank you, Barry! Excellent suggestion! That should be safe for my natural soaps. I wouldn’t want to expose it to anything that could possibly be harmful.

      Reply
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  30. Eric Neumann

    I’m sorry if this has been suggested, I couldn’t make it through all eighty comments.

    If you had access to a 3d printer, you could create any pattern you wish, within the constraints imposed by the process of mold making. For geometrically complex patterns, you may need a mold release agent.

    Reply
  31. J -Negative

    Hi!

    This technique looks really great! I can’t wait to try it with some objects. However I’m wondering if you or anyone checking out this forum, has ever attempted to make a mold out of an already existing mold? I already have my negative made out of foam, but I would love to make a new one out of something more durable like silicone (since the foam is not in the best condition anymore after making many plaster copies). If I make a positive with silicone in my already existing foam mold and let it dry, do you think it would be possible to try to make a new mold from this object with the same silicone material? I would totally appreciate any insight, advice, tips, comments?

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey,

      I’m no expert but if you read through the comments I think this has already been discussed! Sorry I can’t be more of a help…

      Reply
  32. Danielle

    do you think I would be able to make a berries mold… Say out of raspberries? or maybe something firmer like strawberries? or is the silicone too stiff?

    Reply
  33. Tawana

    I want to make positive molds of 3D items such as shells, starfish, etc. Any suggestions for making a mold that has form and design on both sides?

    Reply
  34. arjun menon

    Hey
    I would like to know if the silicone mould can create objects based out of PC-ABS. I found this link which mentioned processing conditions for the PC-ABS resin – http://www.viewmold.com/Injection%20Mold%20Management/resin%20processing%20condition/PC_ABS%20processing%20condition.html

    The object I am longing to create is a pair of headphones.
    I have a 3D printed positive made out of ABS. With that I can shape the mould but I like to know your opinions and advice as to have a pro set in hands.

    Thanks.

    Reply
  35. donna

    eons ago I used a mold to make candles but here’s the great part…I used finials like from a bed post to make the mold…The candles were amazing!

    Reply
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  37. Lidia

    Dziękuję za podzielenie się pomysłem! Wszędzie szukałam, jak można zrobić własne formy do żywicy. Zamierzam zrobić trochę wlasnej biżuterii.
    Na pewno wypróbuję :)

    Reply
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  39. Zara

    Trying to make a mould for a lego piece for my sister. Thanks for that, I have tried other methods but they didn’t work. Will try this method soon but exactly how much soap and water. Thanks xx

    Reply
  40. annette

    I love your information on making molds. I have a small toy dinosaur that fits in my hand and would like to make a mold of it. Once I have the mold made what can I use to form my new dinosaurs? Will air dried clay work or what do you suggest? These dinosaurs will just be painted and set on a shelf. Help!

    Reply
  41. Naomi

    Which bathroom brand did you use? The only bathroom specific one I could didn’t work. I saw later on the tube it read that it it supposed to stay tacky.

    Reply
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  43. Blue

    Hey, nice tutorial. I’ve been experimenting with this over the weekend and have gotten some pretty great results. :)

    I have a question though. Is it safe to bake the molds in an oven? I’m not using this for food, but I do plan on molding stuff out of polymer clay, and to avoid potential warping of the shape, I’m hoping to bake the molds in the oven, with the polymer clay still inside. The silicone I used is resistant to at least 250C in temperature, so that isn’t an issue, but I’m worried the silicone might release harmful contaminants into our oven while it’s baking.

    Have you tried baking your molds before?

    Reply
  44. Sylvie

    Wow, amazing wealth of information. Joel Haas you really contributed some great info. Thanks. I’m so looking forward to doing this. I have been wanting to make a dog/cat tic TAC toe board for outside use and this will be perfect to cast concrete pieces. Thank you all so much.

    Reply
  45. daniella

    i made this mold yesterday and the mold is still not dry yet(its still sticky), did i do something wrong? If so, do you know of anyways for me to remove the object from the silicone?

    I had followed the same instructions using GE 100% silicone II in the color white and had used dawn soap. when i had pressed the object into the mold, the mold did not stick to my hand but it did stick to a different object so, i had placed some soapy water on the object before pressing it into the mold. now as i stated before the silicone still has not dried over the course of 12 hours:(

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Daniella!

      ARGH! I can feel your frustration. Everything you have done sounds correct and in my experience the silicone would have dried by now. My advice is to leave it a little longer. That type of silicone might just need more time. In the end it will stop being sticky (otherwise what would you use it for!?) and you should be able to remove the object without having the wash off the sticky silicone.

      The only thing I can think of for the future is to spend more time kneading the silicone in the soap or a stronger soap/higher concentration in the mixture. I hope it sets for you really soon!

      Fran

      Reply
      1. Charles

        With the GE caulk, it took weeks for mine to set up to feel firm then it relessed the positive fine.

        Reply
  46. ирина

    Привет!!! Можно ли сделать форму для винтажного,декоративного ключа ?Нужно наверное две половинки слеить ,чтобы получить полную форму ключа?Благодарю!

    Reply
  47. Max

    Just some thoughts on silicon. It is a mixture of carbon (from wood) and silicate (from stone). When it cures it generates acetic acid (vinegar). I don’t know that adding vinegar will accelerate setting time.
    Silicons adhere best to smooth surfaces by a vacuum. I would put oil on something valuable before coating with silicon. I think the soap in this mix insulates the plug. silicones have a water demand so added water probably helps the setting. They can stretch about 4 times their original length.

    Reply
  48. Roseanne M

    I’m curious. What is the purpose of the hand soap? Does it have to be colored? Or does the color help you see the clear silicone?

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Roseanne,

      The silicone reacts with a chemical in the hand soap which speeds up the setting process. I don’t think it has to be a colourful soap but I’ve not tried it with colourless soap so I’m not 100% sure of that. Thanks for reading!

      Fran

      Reply
      1. Roseanne M

        Thanks so much for the reply. Well, I tried this yesterday and it was an epic failure. The silicone totally stuck to the gloves (medical type) that I was wearing, and I ended up with more in the mold than in my container. I needed it for several minutes and it just never seem to change texture? Finally I gave up and slapped it in a plastic container and shoved in the item. It did pop out of the container this morning, but there were tons of air bubbles. When massaging the silicone in the water, it looked nothing like your photos! It was real stringy. What brand are you using? I know I bought silicone sealant. Any ideas?

        Thanks again!
        Roseanne

        Reply
      2. Tempo

        Ive seen silicone used to make fishing flys, the bloke painted the silicone from time to time using Photography Fixer (whatever that is) which made it set immediately allowing for more work and more additions instantly. (just sayin)

        Reply
  49. Beth

    I enjoyed reading your article! Thanks for the tips! Just want to add: use RTV or “Room Temperature Vulcanizing” silicones that are mixed in two parts (a base and a catalyst) to induce curing. Its high tear strength makes it the choice of professional mould makers. When creating your own mould, there will need to be a positive and negative item. A positive item is an item that is duplicated for multiple uses. For instance, the positive item would be a bracelet, pendant or toy. The negative item is the mould of the object you need to replicate. When the silicone mould has finished setting, and the original object has been removed – this would become your negative item. Having a reusable mould saves you time and energy in duplicating your products, which is critical for any business (or crafter) hoping to keep their bottom line down. Read more here: http://dalchem.com.au/how-to/how-to-make-silicone-moulds

    Reply
  50. PattiCakes

    Oh, you have inspired me so much! I was cruising the internet looking for ideas on a kitchen reno that I’m doing and want to make something out of paper mache’ and thought I would need a mold to accomplish what I was thinking. THIS IS PERFECT! With this technique I am going to make antique tin ceiling tiles out of paper to finish a very ugly kitchen ceiling. The silicone mold idea is perfect and I can see my vision coming to light! I ordered one tile piece that I will use to make the mold and have already targeted the paper mache’ recipe that I will use. I will post pics of what it turns out to look like!

    Reply
    1. Denise

      brillant! I have 24×24 tin ceiling tiles that I could use! Please let me know how it works and the process ! OMG ! The things I could do with this! Thanks for the ideas !
      D.

      Reply
  51. Paula baker

    Hi,I want to reproduce river rocks as soap,either cold press or melt and pour and was wondering if that would be possible using silicone. I realise I will have to leave just a small opening in the mold and be able to sort of peel the mold off the rock nearly turning the mold inside out in preference to cutting it open which I would then have to join before pouring soap into mold making it messy and with a join line I don’t want. Any ideas anyone!!!

    Reply
  52. derek

    When the mold has “cured” is it fully cured silicone or is it still fragile and mushy? I’m not in need of making stuff from the mold but the mold itself for a piece of art and I need it to withstand some abuse from people handling it. I’ve tried just using straight silicone without the soap and water but it takes way too long to cure.

    Reply
    1. max

      Someone did mention Oogoo somewhere. By mixing cornstarch with silicon you get water right into the silicon and it cures quickly. Small batches as it sets fast. Build up in layers. Google Oogloo. Good luck.

      Reply
  53. farnaz

    Hi! I
    was searching for a way to make a star wars cake mold for a birthday party , i couldn’t find what i wanted and other related molds and cake pans are unreasonably expensive…. I read the comments but still no sure which material is the safest for cakes.
    I will be so glad if you can help me based of your experience… :)

    Reply
  54. Adele Basson

    May I ask, I want to make candle holders out of cement can I make a silicone mould and then pour the cement into the mould. … the mould that I want to make will have a few rounding in the shape , to take of the mould from the cement object , do you think I can just rolled it down.

    Reply
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  57. Emma Hislop

    Fab tutorial! Ive seen this before with all usa crafters using ‘blue dawn’ hand soap…. Which I cannot find for cheap in the uk. What hand soap do you recommend? Does it need a specific active ingredient??

    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Emma!

      I used the absolute cheapest handsoap I could find and it worked every time! I don’t think it needs a special ingredient but perhaps buy a couple of different brands to try out? x

      Reply
  58. sue collins

    I scrolled through rather quickly looking for comments on making silicone molds for making stepping stones. I plan to use various leaves as patterns. The two inquiries I noticed did not have a reply. One was exactly what I’m wanting to do. Gather leaves during the summer, make my molds and when we build our house this fall, have my casts ready for left over concrete after pouring our foundation. I hope someone can advise.

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Sue!

      By the sounds of it I think your project would work but it depends on how large you would like the stones to be. The silicone is ideal and cheap for smaller projects but when scaling up it might be more cost effective to go with more traditional casts. Also I’m not sure how much of the leaf detail you would preserve. However as I said, the materials are cheap to buy so you could test it out first before committing to the full scale project.

      Thanks,

      Fran

      Reply
  59. Lubna

    Hi can you please tell me can I use this recipe to make silicon mould for cake lace will this work or not? And can you use any silicon u use in bathroom tiles or it’s different thanks

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Lubna,

      Don’t use the silicone for food use! Lots of chemicals you definitely don’t want in your cake! I think you can buy cheap moulds that are great for making lace on cakes.

      Thanks! xx

      Reply
  60. Casey

    Do you think this would be possible to use on fabric items such as pillows or stuffed animals? Would I have to coat the item with something before applying the silicone?

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Casey!

      That’s a tricky question to answer. I’ve only tried it on a small scale with non-porous items so I’m not sure if it works on fabric. Perhaps if you waxed the fabric first? It would be worth doing a few test runs on a smaller pieces to see the results. I’d love to hear more about it! :)

      Reply
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  62. rosy

    hi. i’m from the u.s.
    i’m late to the party but i recently made a silicone mold using this method. i was wondering if the vinegar-y smell ever goes away? or will the mold always smell like that?

    Reply
  63. Donna

    I just tried this…several mistakes. I used too tall of a container which made it super difficult to remove. The areas where I embedded my pieces had a lot of bubbles. How do you get it smooth?

    Reply
  64. Steve

    Great guide this – esp about the ratio of soap to water.

    I am going to try this to make a mould of a tractrix hifi horn. If you imagine a large continually curving / opening vase.
    The volume is quite large, around 3 litres (I checked by filling it with water, so I will build up the silicone in layers I think, so each sets.
    Question is at what point / thickness to release the mould from the horn? Too thin walled and it will not retain it’s shape, too thick or solid I may never get it out. I will use Vaseline or similar to try to prevent the silicone getting too attached to the object. It will be an inside mould but the end is open about 1.5″ so I can push it out from there and work at it.

    I’ll try getting some smaller samples to cure first.

    I understand that it’s the glycerine in soap that acts on the silicone to speed up setting.

    Once I have my mould I will lay up gel-coat and then 3-4 layers of glass fibre resin, which I am used to working with.

    Here goes…

    Reply
  65. angel

    Is the smell really awful? because I made it and almost throw up because of the chemical smell.. is there any particular brand that has less smell on it or its normal for it to have a strong chemical smell?

    Reply
  66. Carol

    Thanks from Ireland for sharing this fran and also to everyone that has added their knowledge and ideas. . I’m so excited, but doubt I’ll get much sleep tonight thinking of what to do as I have a lot of sad furniture that I plan to update with plaster mouldings xxx

    Reply
  67. johnas

    hi, just wana share somethng too, if you dnt want your mold sticking on to your end product try brushing your mold with color guard, its what we dental tech’s uses to keep our cast mold from sticking from dental matirials when we are processing it,, and thanks ms.Fran for the tutorial, i can use it making decorative molds,
    by the way dont mind the miss splells okay,,, lol,,

    Reply
  68. John Nelson

    Any ideas about changing the color of the mold (silacone). I think it would make it easier to see any imperfections. Thanks for the ideas. Good job!

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey John,

      A great suggestion. You can get so many different colours now that would make it easier to see the imprint! I just like the clear ones because I think they look good! haha!

      Reply
      1. John

        Just to let you know Fran… I’m jumping into this DIY thing with both feet. You’ve inspired me with the quality of you process. The amount of your followers is impressive and the time you take to follow up is a credit to dedication. I’ll be making molds, soap, and candles and following you example. I see blog in my future!

        Reply
        1. fran Post author

          Yes John!

          Thank you so much for your lovely compliments and I wholeheartedly recommend starting a blog. Please let me know when you do. I’d love to read more!

          Fran

          Reply
  69. Jane

    Oh this is just too awesome for words!!! i came across this yesterday and decided today to read through the comments. Many thanks to you Fran…I was looking for something this easy and economical to try molds. And thanks to everyone for all the additional tips and suggestions. Great help!!! Have you, or anyone else here, tried pouring UTEE into one of these molds? UTEE melts to 350 so I was curious as to how the mold would hold up or react. I would love to hear about your experiences!

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Trisha!

      The silicone has all sorts of harmful chemicals in it so I would avoid for fondant and any other food items. I definitely need to look into food safe mould making though… leave that with me! x

      Reply
  70. sara

    Hi guys. Im trying to make a mould to make a personal chocolate bar for valentines day. Can i use this method for the mould? If not do you have any suggestions.
    I live in a small town thats very limited.
    Cheers

    Reply
  71. Sassa

    Hi…Could you please advise? I have a painted art deco face wall plaque and I would love to make a couple more, would this be possible to make a mould from my face plaque or would it harm it? Thanks Sassa

    Reply
  72. michelle

    My silicone won’t set…can I do something…maybe put in oven? I have tried to make this several times I have followed the directions this is the closest I have gotten. Clear silicone and concentrate dish soap!!!! HELP

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Michelle! Don’t put it in the oven!! It won’t help and the silicone is very toxic. It doesn’t need to be clear – it can be any colour but it needs to have silicone in the ingredients and on the label. Also the soap I used is hand soap rather than dish soap. This might be why it isn’t working for you at the moment. Keep us up to date on your progress!

      Reply
    2. Martha

      If the silicone mold has been sitting for a few days and is still sticky, there isn’t much you can do to re-set it. I’ve found that soaking it for 3-4 days in a bucket of very soapy water will sometimes harden the outside so it’s usable. If it’s just certains spots that didn’t set correctly you can also try covering those sections with new caulk (silicone loves to stick to itself).

      Things to try with the initial mix
      — using a higher soap-to-water ratio
      — work the silicone under the water for longer until if feels like slightly stiff clay (like Fimo)
      — If you are using GE brand caulk, make sure you are using SIlicone I and not Silicone II. SIlicone II has a different formulation that has had setting issues for me.

      Hope that helps! :)

      Reply
  73. Martha

    Just stopping by to leave a giant THANKS for this post! It was what kicked off my plunge into mold making back in 2014 and I have had so much fun making things since. :)

    Reply
  74. Cheri darden

    Hi, I was wondering if this would work for bigger projects. I want to make some concrete heart stepping stones from a valentine candy box. Do you think if I made the mold from that box, I could reuse it to make many hearts?

    Reply
    1. fran Post author

      Hey Cheri,

      You would need quite a lot of silicone but I don’t see why it wouldn’t work :D

      Reply

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